Amar & Taara

A Love Story.

The Gentle Giant and The Warrior Princess

Serving the Voiceless

“Tigers are near extinction in the wild that they could become extinct in the next 20 years. Their decline represents a crying visible failure to save endangered species and protect healthy environment. Fewer than 3,500 wild tigers live in 13 countries (Bangladesh, Bhutan, Cambodia, China, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Russia, Thailand and Vietnam) occupying less than 7% of their historical range, a dramatic plunge from an estimated 100,000 a century ago with 40,000 tigers in India alone. Cambodia, China, Vietnam, and DPR Korea historically known to have stable populations are left with no evidence of breeding populations. The irony is that more tigers are found in captivity in United States alone (about 5,000) than in the wild! The question is therefore more crucial than ever: can we save wild tigers?

Overhunting, destruction and fragmentation of habitat have been the main causes to the fast decline of tigers. Stopping overhunting including their preys is a key role in the conservation strategies of tigers. Overall, current tiger conservation activities are not reversing the decline in tiger numbers. On November 22, 2010, the World Bank organized the Tiger Summit in St. Petersburg, Russia, the most significant meeting ever held to find solutions to save one single animal! The Tiger Summit aimed to double tiger numbers in the wild by 2022, restore and reconnect tiger habitat on a large landscape level and bring illegal trafficking under control. However, the most important action to save tigers relies on the local level over large scales; the summit alone will not halt their decline. A colossal local involvement throughout various initiatives will warranty long-term success to save wild tigers. Those who are doing the daily in the field (and sometimes dirty) work to save tigers and their habitats (e.g., rangers and anti poaching units) have been underpaid and underrepresented. On the opposite, those writing documents in offices and participating in summits are highly paid! Local people are the backbone of future success and they should receive rewarding higher salaries and compensations for saving one of the most venerated animals on Earth. Based upon current population status, aggressive comprehensive conservation activities should be focused in India, Sumatra, and the Russian Far East where most tigers persist. Tiger will be seen as a test-case for whether countries and human being as a whole are really serious about saving biological diversity.” Endangered Species International.

SOS TIGER FOUNDATION

100% of the proceeds at School of Samaya go towards our Tiger and Environmental projects.
Get involved in your community and be part of the change.

GIVE A GIFT OF PURPOSE

Book a meditation retreat or wellness treatment for a friend or family member and support our cause in their name.  100% of the proceeds are donated towards our Tiger and Environmental projects in their name. Sign up to any program on the School of Samaya platform and 100% of your fees gets donated in your name. What better way to show your gratitude to nature and to still journey within. 

Karen & Tjaart adopted and saved Amar, a Siberian tiger and Taara, a Bengal Tiger from the medicinal export trade. They have tried to create a sanctuary for these two sentient beings and now care for over 100 wild birds and two family of wild geese that come for feeding. In addition, Karen and Tjaart have dedicated their birthdays to planting trees at their sanctuary. Their mission, be the change you wish to see in the world.

According to WWF, the tiger population is now 3890 tigers left in the world in the wild. They are illegally killed or poached because their pelts are valuable in the black market trade, their body parts are used in traditional Asian medicines and they are seen as threats to human communities. There is also large scale habitat loss due to human population growth and expansion.

Amar and Tara have an amazing home at the School of Samaya Sanctuary and are cared for personally by Karen and Tjaart Kruger. In additional to contributing towards environmental care, Tjaart and Karen regularly plant trees and take care of the wild bird life on their Sanctuary. As a rule Karen and Tjaart do not use Amar and Taara as any form of exhibition or training objects for the benefit of financial gain, however as a memoir to them you can subscribe to A Mother of Tigers VLog where 100% of the donations go towards the care and well being of Amar and Taara, and in the process enjoy exclusive video and image footage with stories about their journey at the SOS Sanctuary.

So your donations big or small makes a huge difference towards our cause and we thank you in advance.

Please note it is our policy not to objectify Amar and Tara and hence you won’t find any pictures of them and we will not share any pictures as well. Please read our Disclaimer and Indemnity again. Our purpose is in protecting these two amazing beings and that means from ourselves as well. You are able to enjoy their journey at the sanctuary through the Vlog Documentary offered on a donation basis per episode or an annual membership donation.

We are our own worse enemies and hence the need protecting from!

ALL proceeds from School of Samaya go towards our cause. No profits are shared amongst any trustees or directors. Every volunteer in the organisation is focused on serving their higher purpose by donating time, resources and expertise to our environmental and educational projects.

Saving the Tigers is one of our causes. 

Related Links |

https://www.tigers.org.za

https://www.wwfindia.org/about_wwf/priority_species/bengal_tiger/why_save_the_tigers/

http://tigertime.info/the-crisis/why-save-the-tiger

“If nature has made anything more beautiful than a tiger then I do not know what it might be.”

Stephen Fry

  • There are as few as 3,500 tigers left in the wild, we have to act now or this iconic animal could be extinct in less than 20 years.
  • As apex predators, tigers shape the ecosystems in which they live.
  • They prevent over-grazing by limiting herbivore numbers and maintain ecological integrity.
  • Tigers are solitary and have large home ranges making them excellent ‘umbrella’ species providing space for a variety of other species to flourish.
  • In India, more than 350 rivers originate from tiger reserves. These reserves also sequester carbon, provide oxygen and slowly release ground water to regulate floods. Protecting the tiger will in turn protect these vital habitats.
  • Protecting existing tiger habitats and the reforestation of degraded habitat may help buffer the poorest communities in Asia against the impacts of river siltation and flooding, while providing global benefits.
  • Saving the tiger will help communities and local populations benefit from habitat resources and tourism.
  • Man is solely responsible for the slaughter of the tiger. In the natural world the tiger’s only predator is man. It is our collective responsibility to stop the killing and save the tiger in the wild.
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VLOG DOCUMENTARY

Amar & Taara

The Gentle Giant and The Warrior Princess Vlog is presented by Karen and Tjaart. To gain access subscribe to the monthly membership today and enjoy exclusive footage of these amazing Sentient Beings. Journey with Karena and Tjaart on their spiritual parenting skills and make viewing a fun filled educational family activity. 

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